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Posts Tagged ‘Seasonal Allergies’

allergies

Seasonal allergies are commonly referred to as allergic rhinitis a.k.a. “hay fever” if the nose is mostly affected and allergic conjunctivitis if the eyes are involved.

Allergic rhinitis affects up to 40 percent of children and 10 to 30 percent of adults in the United States. It is referred to as “seasonal” if symptoms occur at particular times of the year or “perennial” if it occurs year round.

Common symptoms of seasonal allergies include sneezing, itchy eyes, nasal congestion, headache, and fatigue.  These symptoms can have a tremendous negative impact on the quality of life and on productivity. American workers lose an estimated 6 million work days yearly to this disorder, as well as incurring costs of several billion dollars in medical care.

Seasonal allergies usually occur from spring to early fall, and are due to pollens from trees, grass and weeds.    Interestingly, in this neck of the woods people associate the now beautiful yellow blooming acacia trees as the main source of allergies at this time. However, the fact is that the acacia pollen is quite heavy and usually just falls to the ground. Coincidentally at this same time, Birch, oak and a number of grasses are the real allergy producing culprits.

Perennial allergies, occurring throughout most of the year, are caused by indoor factors such as dust mites, animal dander, and mold.

Nasal stuffiness from allergic rhinitis can cause swelling and obstruction of the sinuses which can lead to a sinus infection.

There is a strong association between allergic rhinitis and asthma.  Up to 50 percent of patients with asthma have allergic rhinitis. Sleep disorders in adults and a high proportion of ear infections in children are also associated with allergic rhinitis.

Treatment for people who think they have allergic rhinitis can begin with an over the counter antihistamine such as Benadryl or Chlortrimeton,  however, they are often associated with the bothersome side effect  of drowsiness.  They should be avoided in children below 2 years of age and in the elderly.    Newer  oral antihistamines such as Claritin, Allegra and Zyrtec, are now available without a prescription and cause significantly less side effects and are more conveniently dosed at once or twice a day.  Steroid nasal sprays such as Nasacort and Flonase are very effective and are now sold over the counter.

Seasonal allergies can also affect the eyes causing redness, tearing, itching, and swelling of the lids. This can be treated with cold compresses and with one of the newer oral antihistamines mentioned above. It would also be worth trying over the counter allergy eye drops such as Zaditor,  Alaway  or Naphcon A.  If these treatments aren’t working sufficiently, see your doctor who can help you decide what treatment is best for your symptoms.

 

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