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Archive for the ‘Vaccines’ Category

flushot

It’s time for me to make my annual plea for everyone to get their flu shot. In today’s column, I’d like to answer common questions I hear about influenza and the flu shot.

– Can’t I get the flu from the flu shot?

This is a very common myth and proven to be wrong. You cannot catch the flu from the flu vaccine. The flu vaccines that are given by needle are made with viruses that are killed (inactivated), and cannot cause an influenza infection.

– I’ve had the flu shot previously and I got the flu anyhow.

This is possible, but not likely, in that no vaccine is 100 percent effective.

– I’ve never had a flu shot and have never had the flu.

Consider yourself lucky, and as in most cases, one’s luck will usually wear out. Don’t take a chance, this could be the year.

– The flu is no big deal.

Tell that to those who have not survived a bout of influenza, or to the worker who misses a week or more of work, as well as the student missing time from school. Besides, having the flu can make you feel very miserable.

– I worry that it could be harmful to my baby/child to have yet another vaccination.Babies have a higher incidence of death due to influenza. There is no proof that the flu vaccine worsens or changes the effects of the other routine childhood vaccinations. The recommendation is that everyone from six months of age and older should receive the flu vaccine.

– I have already gave a chronic disease and I take lots of medications. Do I really need a flu shot too?

All the more reason to receive a flu shot since the flu is the most deadly for those with chronic medical conditions.

– I have a tremendous fear of getting a shot.

The flu vaccine is available as a nasal spray and is approved for those between the ages of 2 to 49 years of age. It has been proven to be more effective than the shot in children 2 to 8 years of age. The viruses used to develop the nasal spray flu vaccine are alive but weakened (attenuated).

– I’m pregnant, won’t a flu shot harm my baby?

Not only has the flu vaccine injection been proven to be safe during pregnancy, but is highly recommended for pregnant women in any trimester of pregnancy. Only the injection form of flu vaccine and not the nasal spray should be used in pregnancy.

– I’m 35 years old and healthy, do I really need a flu shot?

In 2009-10, the swine flu (H1N1 virus) took a particularly heavy toll on the age group 18 to 64 years of age. Better safe than sorry.

– Any reason I absolutely shouldn’t get a flu shot?

There are a few reasons, the most common being a prior allergic reaction to a flu shot or a severe allergy to eggs. The vaccine should be delayed if you have an illness with a fever.

– When should I get the shot?

The flu season typically begins as early as October and can last until late spring. Flu shots are currently available and I advise getting it sooner rather than later. It takes about two weeks after receiving the shot for it to become effective.

– Where can I get a flu shot?

Most major pharmacies such as Rite Aid, Walgreens and CVS, provide flu shots on a drop- in basis, as well as through most primary care doctor’s offices. Larger medical groups such as mine, the Palo Alto Medical Foundation, will have special drop in flu clinic days. For children, call your child’s primary care provider to find out how they are to receive a flu vaccination.

– How much will a flu shot cost me?

For most people it is free, either because they have a government insurance plan such as MediCare or MediCruz, or they have private insurance. For those who have no such coverage, the out-of-pocket cost of flu vaccine is between $30 to $50 depending on which vaccine is given.

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Small pox, polio, diphtheria, tetanus, measles, mumps and rubella are all potentially life-threatening diseases that have been almost completely eliminated from our society during our lifetimes. The reason for this is the routine childhood immunization program that has been widely accepted in the United States, as well as most of the modern world.

We often hear about the supposed side effects of immunizations, but we rarely hear about children getting the very diseases that the vaccines protect against. That’s because the immunization program has worked so well in preventing diseases that could have killed millions and caused untold suffering.

In fact, we’ve been so successful immunizing children and preventing diseases that some might wonder whether vaccines are still needed.

Here’s why immunizations are still necessary:

– Newborn babies are immune to many diseases, because they have antibody protection from their mothers. This immunity is mostly gone by the end of the first year of life, leaving unvaccinated babies susceptible to the abovementioned vaccine-preventable illnesses.

– Although our country has virtually eliminated these diseases, many Third World countries with poor immunization programs are still plagued by vaccine-preventable illnesses. These diseases are only a plane ride away. An infected traveler could bring such an illness back to the States, where it could spread rapidly if people were not adequately immunized.

– In the U.S., pertussis (whooping cough) is making a comeback, and tetanus is still infecting some people.

– Widespread immunization is necessary because it helps to keep a disease from spreading within a population. This helps to protect those few who, whether by choice or by necessity, are not immunized.

Immunizations are safe. A decade ago, an unsubstantiated study tried to link immunizations to autism. A well-publicized article from England sounded the alarm connecting the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine to autism. This started a grassroots movement that has led many to reject all vaccinations. However, the majority of the authors of that article have withdrawn their support for it, and the lead author was found guilty of professional misconduct and had his license to practice medicine revoked.

Many well-controlled scientific studies have all concluded that there is no scientific or statistical relationship between immunizations and autism.

Unfortunately, the rates of immunized children entering kindergarten in Santa Cruz County are some of the lowest in the nation, with only 84 percent fully vaccinated. The San Lorenzo Valley is even lower, with just 65 percent fully immunized.

Just recently, Felton had a measles scare, prompting a major investigation. The outcome was favorable this time, as it did not infect anyone except the carrier, but a significant epidemic could spread through our area in the future because of our low immunization rates.

Until vaccine-preventable illnesses are eliminated worldwide, as with deadly smallpox — a result of the most successful immunization program ever — I strongly recommend that as many of our children as possible be routinely immunized and thus protected from potentially life-threatening diseases.

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I would like to make my annual plea for everyone to get a flu shot.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is a good supply of the vaccine available this year, enough for 135 million doses.

Influenza, commonly called the flu, is unpredictable. During the 2009-10 season the “swine flu” was a pandemic, causing thousands of hospitalizations and many deaths worldwide.

It is estimated that during an average flu season, 250,000 to 500,000 people die worldwide from complications of the flu. Although last year’s flu season was relatively mild, there were still numerous deaths, including 35 children who died of influenza in the U.S.

This year’s vaccine contains two new strains, plus the same H1N1 as last year. Children 6 months and older and almost all adults should be vaccinated, starting now. The vaccine’s effectiveness should last all season. Children 8 years and younger need two doses only in the first year they are vaccinated.

Flu shots are safe at any stage of pregnancy and are especially important for expectant mothers, as they are much more likely to have a serious illness resulting from the flu and could thus be more likely to miscarry or have a premature delivery. A pregnant woman’s flu shot stimulates her immune system, creating antibodies that cross the placenta into the fetus. That protects her baby during the first six months after birth, before the infant is old enough to be vaccinated.

There’s no need to delay receiving the flu shot because of a mild illness, but don’t get a shot if you have a fever. Waiting until the fever is gone or until you’re feeling better after a more moderate or severe illness is the rule.

Many people worry that a flu shot might give them the flu. That is just not true. The viruses found in the flu shots have been inactivated (killed), and dead germs cannot cause illness. They do, however, stimulate the immune system to create antibodies to help prevent the flu.

The only people who should not get a flu shot are those who:

– Are allergic to egg products.

– Have already had a bad reaction to influenza vaccine (extremely rare).

– Have had an episode of a neurological disease called Guillain-Barre syndrome.

A few minor side effects may briefly occur from the flu shot, such as a mild ache and redness at the injection site, a low-grade fever and mild body aches.

I look at it this way: Why not get a vaccination that has minimal side effects and has a good chance at preventing an illness that could make you feel terrible for a week and also make you miss work? It’s a cheap form of health insurance.

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It’s that time of year again to start making preparations for the flu season, which can begin as early as October and last as late as May.

Influenza, the name of the virus for which the “flu” season is named, causes a highly contagious respiratory infection that often starts very quickly and may cause the following symptoms:

– Fever, headache and extreme fatigue

– Cough, sore throat and runny or stuffy nose

– Body aches and sometimes vomiting and diarrhea

The flu can cause mild to severe illness and occasionally can lead to death. Most healthy people who contract the flu recover without complications. However, some people, especially the elderly and the very young, as well as those with chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, and asthma, are at a high risk for serious complications of the flu. One of the most deadly side effects of the flu is pneumonia, which is a very serious lung infection.

The flu usually spreads from person to person via respiratory droplets when someone who is ill coughs or sneezes. It also often spreads when a person touches some object that has the influenza virus on it and then touches the mouth, nose or eyes.

A person coming down with the flu is contagious from one day before any symptoms appear and remains contagious for up to five days after the symptoms begin.

The best way to prevent getting influenza is to get a flu vaccination. The vaccine is approved for use in people older than 6 months of age. Almost everyone can benefit from the flu shot, but it is highly recommended for the following groups:

– Pregnant women and children younger than 5 years

– People 50 years of age and older and those with chronic medical conditions

– Those who live in nursing homes or other long-term care facilities

– People who work or live with those at high risk for complications of the flu

The flu shot contains a dead virus which, when injected via a needle in the arm, will cause a person’s immune system to create antibodies to help prevent one from getting infected. This vaccine cannot give anyone the flu, but it can cause side effects of soreness, redness or swelling at the injection site, low-grade fever and aches. These side effects are usually very mild and last only a few days. In extremely rare instances, a severe reaction may occur, as is possible with any vaccination or medical procedure. Don’t get vaccinated if you have a severe allergy to chicken eggs, have ever had a bad reaction to a flu shot or are ill with a fever.

Flu shots are already available at many doctors’ offices and also are being conveniently provided by the local pharmacies CVS, Walgreens and Rite Aid for about $30 cash, with Medicare and some private insurance accepted.

I think of the flu shot as being a form of cheap health insurance. I’ve already gotten mine and hope that you will, too.

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I recently tuned in to a local radio station talk show in which the host and a “non-medical doctor” were criticizing vaccinations by citing false information and providing their personal bias. I would like to offer my view of vaccinations.

Most vaccines contain parts of a germ or toxin that have been made so weak that they can no longer cause illness, but will stimulate one’s immune system to make antibodies against that disease. Therefore, in the future, when they are exposed to that particular germ, the antibodies should prevent one from getting sick.

Since vaccines were first developed in the late 1700s, millions of lives have been saved. Smallpox, which wiped out entire civilizations, has actually been totally eliminated from the face of the Earth because of the smallpox vaccine. I watched friends come down with polio in the 1950s and become permanently paralyzed. This was a fearful disease until the polio vaccine banished it from the U.S.

We have effectively controlled outbreaks of common diseases such as measles, mumps, diphtheria and chicken pox. Before the chicken pox vaccine became available, more than 11,000 Americans were hospitalized and more than 100 died each year from the disease. It is estimated that measles, one of the most contagious diseases in the world, could cause almost 3 million deaths worldwide if vaccinations were stopped.

Commonly asked questions

Are vaccines safe? I believe they are. Thousands of people take part in clinical trials before a vaccine is approved. Millions of people are vaccinated every year. Some people may get local reactions of pain, swelling and redness at the vaccination site, but this lasts only a few days.

Can vaccines cause autism? I know this is an extremely controversial issue, but I can find no scientific proof in the peer-reviewed literature to directly link vaccines and autism. Common pediatric vaccines, with the exception of some flu shots, no longer contain mercury or thimerosal, chemicals often implicated with vaccine side effects.

Are infants getting too many shots at once? In general, infants tolerate these vaccines very well. Every day, infants come into contact with millions of particles such as bacteria, viruses and pollen that impact their immune systems. Delaying shots can leave a child unprotected against certain diseases, many of which can have dangerous complications such as seizures, brain damage, blindness and even death.

If everyone gets vaccinated, will my child still need them? It is true that an unimmunized child has less of a chance of catching a disease if everyone else is immunized, but if a larger number of children are not immunized, then there will be a greater chance of highly contagious diseases spreading through the population.

How long does immunity last after getting a vaccine? Many vaccines, such as measles and hepatitis B, lend lifetime immunity. Others, such as tetanus, last for many years but require booster shots.

The bottom line is that vaccinations have saved millions of lives, significantly lessened — and in cases eliminated — certain killer diseases, and have played a significant role in the increased lifespan of humans over the past several generations.

There are many well-intentioned individuals and groups who advocate against vaccinations. I hear what they are saying, but scientific evidence and multiple studies have demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of vaccinations.

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