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Archive for July, 2014

child-immunization-macon-nc

According to a recent public health alert, California is experiencing an epidemic of pertussis, with over 5,000 cases reported this year.

Santa Cruz County has had at least 60 known cases (twice the number as last year) and probably many more cases, which have not been reported or have yet to be diagnosed.

Pertussis, also called whooping cough, is a highly contagious infection of the lower respiratory tract, involving the lungs. It usually manifests as a mild persistent cough, but can advance to a severe cough. Often in children, this cough is followed by a high-pitched intake of breath that sounds like “whoop” – thus the name “whooping cough.”

Pertussis is caused by a germ which is a bacteria and not a virus. It is passed from an infected person who sneezes or coughs and therefore spreads infected tiny droplets into the lungs of anyone who may be nearby.

Once in the lungs, the germs can cause an infection, thereby creating inflammation and narrowing of the lung’s breathing tubes. This produces the cough and the characteristic whooping sound.

Infants are particularly vulnerable because they are not fully immune to whooping cough until they’ve received at least 3 immunization shots.

This leaves those 6 months and younger at greatest risk for catching the infection.

The pertussis vaccine one receives as a child wears off in 5 to 10 years, leaving most teenagers and adults susceptible to the infection during an outbreak.

Also, more parents are choosing not to vaccinate their children, thus lowering the number of immunized individuals. This, coupled with the fact that newer vaccines are less potent than the older ones, has increased transmission of pertussis.

The diagnosis of pertussis is often delayed or missed in infants because early symptoms are often mild and the serious cough may not begin for days or even weeks later.

A severe infection in infants can be fatal, although this is thankfully rare. Three infant deaths due to pertussis have been reported in California since the beginning of the year.

One must consider pertussis for anyone with a cough lasting more than 2 weeks, especially when the person generally feels well, coughs worse at night, and has prolonged coughing spells.

The vaccine for pertussis is combined with the tetanus and diphtheria vaccines which are routinely given to children in their first years of life, and to adults every 10 years.

Besides infants, those who especially need the vaccine protection are pregnant women in their third trimester because they will soon have contact with their unprotected infant.

Mothers have been found to be the greatest source of transmitting whooping cough to the newborn. Infants can also be protected by vaccinating those people who have close contact with them.

This “family” protection has been highly successful in protecting susceptible infants.

Tests are available to diagnose pertussis. The decision whether or not to test should be left to your doctor.

Antibiotics can be effective especially when given soon after symptoms begin. After several weeks of symptoms, they are much less effective.

Family members can also be prescribed preventative antibiotics. Remember that pertussis is caused by bacteria and can usually be treated with an antibiotic, but if you just have a bad cough from something like routine bronchitis, which is caused by a virus, antibiotics are not effective.

Your doctor will be able to determine the proper diagnosis and treatment.

Bottom line: I recommend to immunize your children and keep immunizations up to date for yourselves.

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Terry

I am in remission of my multiple myeloma cancer. The three months of chemotherapy last fall and winter did a great job in knocking out most of those cancerous plasma cells which were taking over my body. The stem-cell transplant I was originally to have following chemotherapy has been canceled. I will have my blood tested regularly to monitor my remission. My thanks to Dr. Michael Wu and his wonderful caring staff at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation oncology department who did a superb job treating my disease.

I discovered that one doesn’t necessarily have to leave Santa Cruz for state-of-the-art cancer care that I found right here through my group at PAMF. I sure wasn’t used to being — nor particularly enjoyed — being on the patient side of the doctor/patient relationship. It was a humbling experience and has taught me more about patients and patience along my journey.

Unfortunately, I am suffering from a fairly severe neuropathy of my feet from the chemo drugs, and this is currently adversely affecting my ability to walk normally. I do, however, feel it’s a small price to pay for my successful cancer treatment. I’m told the neuropathy should improve with time. I’ll try to be patient, (not one of my virtues however).

Another little complication I had in the past month, most likely unrelated to my cancer or treatment, is a condition of my heart called constrictive pericarditis. This occurs when the sac of tissue surrounding the heart (the percardium) becomes inflamed and tightens in on the heart, causing the heart to pump less efficiently.

This threw me into mild heart failure with significant shortness of breath, swelling of lower extremities and general fatigue. Dr. Neil Sawheny, one of my cardiologist partners at PAMF, is treating me for this unexpected complication and I seem to be responding well and improving day by day.

In general , my overall well-being is improving significantly. I feel as though my life as I once knew it is being slowly restored. Once my neuropathy shows signs of improvement, I hope to return to work at least half-time.

I’ll give myself a break to work a bit less since I’ve now been practicing medicine for the past 40 years, 27 years in urgent care Scotts Valley. I love my staff, my patients, many of whom I’ve come to know quite well. Most of all, I love the satisfaction I receive in helping make people feel better and in maintaining their good health.

My thanks to all of you who have mailed get-well cards or sent email messages for my recovery. I am a strong believer in the power of prayer and I know your prayers for me have been heard.

My personal lesson from my cancer experience is this: If you have any health symptoms that seem unusual to you or are lasting longer than you think they should, see your doctor for a work up. If everything checks out OK and your symptoms soon improve, then be thankful.

If something serious like cancer is found, the sooner it’s treated the better the outcome. This a proven fact. Also, for those many of you who are healthy, give thanks every morning that you can begin a new day.

My best wishes to you for long healthy lives.

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